County / 2015 Historical


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  • Business gone, but memory remains

    Stephanie Thompson, People Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    Burger A Go Go. The mere mention of the business' name will cause a few residents to start drooling. The business was known around the town for its maxi burger, also known as the hubcap. Stephen Barrera, son of Faye Bussart who owned Burger A Go Go, said his mother special ordered the buns for the maxi burger from a bakery in Colorado. The buns, which were 8 1/2 inches around, were delivered every couple of days to meet the demand. Barrera said his mother opened the business in the early 70s. Pr... Full story

  • Television's early days in Sweetwater County

    David Martin, Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    Thanks to the internet, entertainment options are plentiful. From streaming video websites such as Netflix, Hulu and Youtube, to online offerings from AMC, NBC and HBO, the internet has helped create an all-you-can-eat buffet of options for almost anything in existence. However, that wasn’t always the case and it wasn’t too long ago when the only options for television entertainment consisted of three different channels, all of which were black and white. The Sweetwater County Historical Museum’s oral history files include a presentation and d... Full story

  • Building remains a bar

    Stephanie Thompson, People Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    In 1872, an adobe and wood building was constructed on 125 E. Railroad Ave. Over the years, this business changed owners and names, but it always acted as bar, even illegally during prohibition. According to historical documents from the Sweetwater County Historical Museum, prominent businessmen, Joe Payne and George Spinner owned the building in the 1800s. The first known business was called the U.P. Saloon. An advertisement for the U.P. Saloon appeared in a Green River Star's 1891 proclaiming... Full story

  • First century witnesses growth

    Jack H. Smith, Staff Writer|Apr 8, 2015

    In 1968, Green River celebrated its 100th anniversary. While some towns of similar sizes may not have witnessed substantial growth in their first century, this was certainly not the case for Green River, the town entered 1968 thriving. Just a quick look back at the Jan. 4, 1968 issue of the Green River Star showed that the town was rapidly expanding with a boom in energy related expansion as well as a thriving downtown area. The lead story on the front page focused on not only substantial mine and trona refinery construction, but also a great... Full story

  • Family fondly remembers GR

    Jack H. Smith, Staff Writer|Apr 8, 2015

    The Green River of today is a far different place than it was 60 years ago. What was once a small railroad town, has increased in population by 9,000 since 1950, and the amount of land in Green River has grown exponentially. Businesses have come and gone, and longtime local families have been joined by a steady stream of newcomers, who are always welcomed with open arms. The railroad has remained a pivotal part of the community, and the six decades have witnessed the area becoming the "Trona... Full story

  • Building still stands, but currently vacant

    Stephanie Thompson, People Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    Theater, hotel open after The Morris Mercantile burns down. Interim Sweetwater County Museum director Brigida Blasi said the Morris Mercantile was built in 1891 owned by Edward J. Morris. He was the son of Esther Hobart Morris, who was known in the community as the first female Justice of the Peace in South Pass City. Edward Morris was the first Green River mayor and a member of the constitutional convention to make Wyoming a state. The Morris Mercantile Company was known for providing Green... Full story

  • Green River had a Sawmill

    James W. June, Green River Historic Preservation Commission|Apr 8, 2015

    (Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared in the Green River Star in 1992.) Green River had a sawmill from the time of the origin of the town in 1868 and operated up until 1920 when the Union Pacific Railroad expanded its railroad yards to the east. The sawmill was located on the north bank of the Green River just above the mouth of the Bitter Creek. There were five enterprising men that could foresee the future of the local area. In 1867, Charles Deloney contracted with the Union Pacific Railroad Company to furnish ties for the r... Full story

  • Snapshot of early Green River

    David Martin, Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    Today, Green River is a small city with nearly 13,000 people and hundreds of businesses, ranging from small, home-based businesses to franchised restaurants and corporate-owned stores. However, a little more than a century ago, Green River’s size and population were much smaller. In fact, a business directory spanning 1908 and 1909 lists only 38 businesses and professions in and around Green River. A transcribed conversation kept at the Sweetwater County Historical Museum between Henry F. Chady and Wiley F. Shaver, occurring October 1970, s... Full story

  • Rock Springs Hide & Fur in business for 102 years

    David Martin, Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    Over the course of a century, many things tend to come and go. Ideas, technology, goods and even services crop up, but get buried in the wake progress creates. This happens with businesses too. However, there are those that survive the test of time and continue on almost like they have when they were first founded. Rock Springs Hide & Fur is one such business. One of the oldest family-owned businesses in Rock Springs, it joins other long-lived businesses including RSNB, Superior Lumber Co.,... Full story

  • Green River, Wyoming and the boom

    David Martin, Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    While many look back at the economic boom occurring in Sweetwater County throughout the 1970s through the lens of Dan Rather's report on Rock Springs during a segment on "60 Minutes" or though hazy recollections involving wild times, one thing people don't often recall is how the boom left a lasting mark on Green River. An interview stored in the Sweetwater County Historical Museum's collection of oral histories sheds a little light on how Green River was impacted by the boom. The interview, tak... Full story

  • Oldest working bank in county

    James W. June, Green River Historic Preservation Commission|Apr 8, 2015

    (Editor’s Note: The following article originally appeared in the Green River Star in 1994.) In 1888, Mr. Robert Morris and Mr. Hunter established the Morris and Hunter Bank and operated it in conjunction with the Hunter & Morris General Merchandise, which was located in block 20 in the Railroad yards on the north side of West Second South, across from the present apartments at 95 South Second West Street. The Morris brothers, Robert and Edward, purchased the Hunter & Morris General Merchandise and the Morris Hunter Bank, forming the Morris M... Full story

  • Teenage hangout remembered

    Stephanie Thompson, People Editor|Apr 8, 2015

    The Sugar Bowl, which was just a white building with a white sign in front of it on Flaming Gorge Way, was the main hangout for teenagers. Green River Resident Richard Watson said he can recall the summer of 1947, he was 23 then and had returned with a seismograph crew to look at an oil expansion project. "I was a little bit old for the Sugar Bowl, because it was kind of a teenage place and I was 23," Watson said. However, that did not stop him from at least checking the place out. According to... Full story

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